Skip to main content

Introduction by the newest member of the OA team

I just thought that as the latest member of the Open Access team here at St Andrews I would introduce myself briefly and give my first impressions.
    Well, A bit of background first. I graduated from Robert Gordon University in 2010 with an MSc in Information and Library Studies. After graduating I drifted around Aberdeen from library to library absorbing information and trying to decide on a career path. In 2011 I moved to St Andrews University Library to work on the Helpdesk. It was here at St Andrews that I first heard about Open Access. Immediately OA sounded like something I wanted to get involved in: it has the perfect mix of philosophy, information technology, opacity (requiring good library detective skills to overcome), and cataloguing (yes cataloguing). Most important to me was/is the ethical dimension to the Open Access cause. Basically, tax payers fund Universities but have to pay again for the fruits of that investment. Open Access seeks to cure this curious injustice by making research output freely available. What is globally applause worthy and truly amazing however is the way OA is enhancing education systems in developing and transition countries by offering free access to high quality current research.
    Well, that’s my background done and dusted. As for my impressions, my enduring impression of the OA team is that there is a lot of work to do and a huge, perhaps intimidating, amount of information to digest. For instance each funder has separate mandates for Open Access, each publisher then has its own mandates, and within each publisher there are journals, each with their individual policies governing what you can and cannot do with research articles. So, when you’ve navigated through the tangled web of policies and mandates, you then have to decide Gold or Green? Also, what if a work has multiple funders attached, which mandate do I use? What does it mean if Funding is given to an external author, does that have to be taken into account? A phrase I used in correspondence with my manager in my first week was “I despair”.
    Long story short: I’m learning and loving every minute of it. And, I will carry on learning and eventually be an expert in Open access mandates, copyright, and policy. The crucial thing is that I and my colleagues are becoming experts in OA so that the academic community at large doesn’t have to. Researchers and academics can rest assured that we have the answers, and the epistemic burden is on us.

Here's a link to my ResearchGate page: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kyle_Brady/contributions?ev=prf_act. You'll find that my dissertation is, surprise surprise, Open Access.

Kyle Brady
Library Assistant (Open Access Support)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Untangling Academic Publishing: Scottish launch for OA Week

St Andrews University Library is delighted to host the Scottish Launch of Untangling Academic Publishing during Open Access Week - the event is open to all, discussion encouraged!

>Please contact libraryoffice@st-andrews.ac.uk if you wish to attend.

Untangling Academic Publishing: Launch and Discussion about the past and future of academic publishingA University Library event for Open Access Week

Tuesday 24 October, 16.00-18.30 - Arts Lecture Theatre (No.31 on the map)

Presentation: Professor Aileen Fyfe, School of History, lead author of the briefing paper ‘Untangling Academic Publishing’, will explain some of the biggest changes in academic publishing over the last 60 years.

Panel Discussion: the talk will be followed by a discussion of possible futures.
Professor Fyfe will be in conversation with Professor Stephen Curry,  Imperial College London and Professor Martin Kretschmer, University of Glasgow.

Presentation and panel discussion will be followed by a wine reception.



Untangling…

Your Open Access - statistics and usage

It's Open Access Week again, and this year the theme is 'Open in order to...' This year's theme is designed to shift discussion away from wider issues of 'openness', and instead direct attention to the tangible benefits of open access. This week we will be publishing a series of posts aimed at  highlighting some of these benefits. In this post we will look at some of the statistics we gather about the open access content in our Repository, and specifically the statistics that we've chosen to highlight in our new Infographic.
Given the theme of this year's Open Access Week, the subject of this post could be appropriately described as 'Open in order to boost downloads' For years we have been collecting usage statistics about the content held in our repository. Up until now this data has been collected and, for the most part, discussed internally; but not any more. Now we want to show the academic community here in St Andrews, whose work populates …

Knowledge Exchange on the costs of Open Access

The cost of Open Access isn't a late-breaking field. In 2014 a cost of £9.2m for UK research organisations to achieve RCUK Open Access compliance was quoted [1]. This is in addition to the millions paid to publishers for article processing charges.  Because the market in scholarly publications is constantly adapting and costs for Open Access and library journal subscriptions are inexorably rising, it's incumbent on institutions to monitor not just the cost of the product, but the cost of managing it.  Open Access and open data have been identified as strategic for Librarians and university senior management [2].


The Knowledge Exchange partnership works at an international level to develop the infrastructure of open scholarship and promote common standards.  It regularly publishes reports on its activities. Its consensus report on monitoring Open Access publications and cost data published April last year makes recommendations based on the work and feedback from stakeholders at…