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International survey on attitudes to open access

St Andrews researchers are invited to complete a very short survey on attitudes to open access.

Professor Thomas Eger from University of Hamburg, together with doctoral student Marc Scheufen, is conducting a survey on the experience of academic scholars with and their perception of open access publishing.
One of our objectives is to examine the commonalities and differences between the academic disciplines. For this purpose, we have already conducted surveys in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the Benelux, France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Turkey, India, Brazil, and Egypt.

It would be of special interest to gather additional information on universities and research institutes in the UK and compare the results with those of the other countries. Therefore, we have decided, in co-operation with Prof. Guido Westkamp from the Queen Mary University of London, to extend the survey to British universities. We would kindly ask you to forward this invitation to all professors and other scholars of the faculties/departments of your university.

Your participation will help to provide valuable information regarding the recent discussion on how to organize the dissemination of academic publications in a globalized and digital knowledge society.

The survey should only take around 10 minutes, and respondents can request the final results.

Please find access to the questionnaire at: http://www.equestionnaire.de/?q=10874

Prof Eger is Vice-Dean for Research and International Affairs Director, Institute of Law & Economics, University of Hamburg.

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