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Clarivate Analytics chosen to provide citation data for REF 2021

Research England has announced that Clarivate Analytics' Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) has been chosen to provide the citation metrics for the next UK research assessment exercise - REF2021.

The data supplied by ISI includes the number of times a publication has been cited in other academic publications - referred to as citation counts. According to the latest Research England press release this has been requested by 11 of the 34 expert panels, and will be used to feed into the peer-review process during the research assessment phase of the REF. ISI will use the citation data collected by Web of Science, and then match it to the publication records supplied by institutions. Regarding concerns about the accuracy of the matching process, RE have offered reassurance:
[I]nstitutions submitting during REF 2021 will be able to view the citation counts for items they plan to submit to the REF in the relevant units of assessment and confirm that a correct match has been ob…
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Feedback requested on implementation of Plan S

Following the recent Wellcome announcement of its revised Open Access Policy, today new guidelines on the implementation of Plan S have been announced. The guidelines are published in full with details of technical requirements at https://www.coalition-s.org/feedback/ and feedback is welcomed from all stakeholders, including the public.


cOAlition S is committed to fulfil the specific target set out in Plan S – immediate Open Access to all scholarly publications from research funded by coalition members from 2020 onward  Three routes to achieve OA will be compliant:
Publish in fully Open Access journals listed in the DOAJ or on Open Access platforms Deposit in Open Access repositories listed in OpenDOARPublish in subscription journals with 'transformative' agreements in place or that permit accepted manuscripts to be deposited immediately with a Creative Commons Attribution licence, such as Royal Society titles The guidelines cover questions of cost, licensing and timing, wit…

Wellcome Trust announces new Open Access policy

Following an 8 month review the Wellcome Trust announced its latest Open access policy on 5 November.

Some key changes Deposit into PubMed Central (PMC) and Europe PMC Articles must be made freely available by the official final online publication date instead of within 6 months of the final publication date Article processing charges (APCs) OA publication in subscription journals (hybrid) will no longer be compliant unless associated with Jisc Collections transformative OA agreementsJournals chosen must be indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)Only journals and platforms that follow criteria that cOAlition S may set out in future for OA journals and platforms will be compliant Pre-prints Authors are encouraged to post pre-peer review pre-prints under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence. This is mandated during public health crises Research assessment Wellcome-funded research organisations must publicly commit to a statement of intrinsic merit of the researc…

Breaking free - out of embargo

The route to Open Access can be surprisingly long and winding. In this last post for Open Access Week 2018 we look at some examples of publications that are now freely available to all from our repository - in most cases a year or more after first publication.

Why wait to make these articles open access, you may ask? Because... "copyright"
The latest article to become open access after a 12 month embargo is:

Understanding a hydroformylation catalyst that produces branched aldehydes from alkyl alkenes, Dingwall, Paul; Fuentes, José A.; Crawford, Luke; Slawin, Alexandra Martha Zoya; Buehl, Michael; Clarke, Matthew L. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/16318

This paper adds to the ever increasing number of freely available publications from our research community - this week we celebrated the milestone of 15,000 items in St Andrews Research Repository!

"This paper is a detailed study aiming to understand a catalytic reaction that gave…

Thesis Thursday 2018 : a wider notion of research

As part of #ThesisThursday in Open Access Week we are pleased to host a fascinating guest post from our colleagues in the Library E-theses team:

Why do we make research theses available in the St Andrews Research Repository?
It’s a question that we are asked from time to time by both research students and academic researchers in our own institution.  Our answer is invariably that the institution should make its research available online to as wide an audience as possible.   Researchers expect to discover material online and they expect to read it online.  We have a policy to collect electronic research theses and make them available open access where possible, (unless subject to embargo), to promote and showcase University research, and to make it as accessible as possible to a global audience.  This is the core of our reasoning as to why we resource and manage the service.

But are ‘researchers’, in the purest sense of the word, our only consumers?  Or does the audience for our thesis…

Kin win to become item 15,000 in the St Andrews Research Repository

To mark the 15,000th item deposited in the St Andrews Research Repository the Open Access Support team is pleased to publish a guest post by its co-author, Andy Gardner:

Dyble, M, Gardner, A, Vinicius, L & Migliano, A 2018, 'Inclusive fitness for in-laws' Biology Letters, vol. 14, no. 10. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0515


Cooperation abounds in nature and in human society, and this has long been a puzzle for evolutionary biologists. At first glance, the traditional Darwinian dictum of the “survival of the fittest” appears to imply that selfishness will reign supreme. But altruism can be favoured by natural selection, if it occurs between closely-related kin. According to the theory of "kin selection", although a gene encoding altruistic behaviour leads to its carrier suffering a cost, it is also providing a benefit to other individuals who carry copies of the very same gene, and this increases its overall transmission to future generations.

However, human notions of ki…

IRUS-UK: statistics and benchmarking for UK repositories

For over 4 years now St Andrews has participated in IRUS-UK – a JISC funded service providing accurate and usable repository download statistics. At the time of writing there are 146 repositories included in the service, which equates to 94% of all eligible UK repositories. This means that as well as being able to track our downloads, we can compare downloads across other institutions too, and this is something that has been enhanced further recently with the addition of a new report, which we’ll look at here. First though we want to look again at an open access book that we've written about previously, including in yesterday’s Open Access Week post.
[D]emand for knowledge can be stifled by access barriers, and when those barriers are taken away, the knowledge is opened up and it can finally satisfy demand.Module theory: an approach to linear algebra. Blyth, Thomas Scott.  Professor Blyth’s book has been archived in St Andrews Research Repository since February 2018, and in this…