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Showing posts from June, 2015

LIBER 2015 paper wins award

The emerging role of institutional CRIS in facilitating Open Scholarship, was recognised by the LIBER Conference Programme Committee with the Innovation Award given to the 3 most innovative and relevant papers submitted to the conference.

St Andrews, together with Aberdeen, was the first UK University to introduce a CRIS (Current Research Information Information System) and, along with other UK HEIs is active in the use of the CRIS to facilitate Open Access and Research Data Management to meet the demands of funder compliance, promote Open Scholarship as a desirable and viable option to researchers and to benefit the wider research community.
The University Library recently appointed Anna Clements Assistant Director to head up the new Digital Research Division, bringing together Open Access, Research Data Management, Digital Humanities and Research Computing, reflecting its importance to the Library and the University.

Anna, who co-authored the paper with Jackie Proven, said "…

New open access data repository for autism research

Stanford University has announced a new and ambitious project to establish the world’s largest collaborative open access repository for data on autism. The project is called The Hartwell Research Technology Initiative, or iHART for short. The project goal is to provide the research community with a centralised repository for biomedical data on autism. It is hoped that the increased access to data will enable greater collaboration across research centres and institutions, and will lead to new techniques for intervention and detection.

The iHART project is funded by a $9 million grant from the Hartwell Foundation - a charitable organisation that grants awards for biomedical research to help children. iHART will be led by Dennis Wall, a specialist in autism spectrum disorder and Associate Professor of Paediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The repository will have an integrated portal that will enable researchers to draw on a variety of data types, ‘including phenotyp…

Open Access in Estonia: the Information Society

Estonia is very advanced in e-government infrastructure compared to the UK. You can't fail to be impressed by its e-Resident initiative.  In 2007 it introduced a Mobile-ID for mobile phones that permits secure authentication and digital signatures. With a population of only about 1.5M the effects of government initiatives are seen quickly and data privacy is legally protected, including access to medical records which are owned by patients. It's fair to say that in this context Open Access and Open Data could be seen as a natural progression. The University of Tartu is leading in open scholarship - sixty-percent of Estonia's successfully defended doctoral theses are generated at Tartu annually. It also has six Centres of Research Excellence of which two are European Commission Centres of Excellence.

In 2012 it began participating in an 8-month project under the auspices of the EIFL (Electronic Information for Libraries) Open Access and Open Data in Estonia Project. The pr…