20 March 2015

New open access e-books available

The contingent of open access e-books in our library catalogue continues to grow with two new recent additions. The books, published by Cambridge University Press, are both Creative Commons licensed and are freely available to read online or download as a pdf.

Open Access and the Humanities, by Martin Paul Eve (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). DOI: 10.1017/CBO9781316161012. CC BY-SA

http://library.st-andrews.ac.uk/record=b2173431~S5
“In the first decade and a half of the twenty-first century, the words ‘open access’ have been uttered with increasing frequency in universities around the world. Beginning as little more than a quiet murmur in niche scientific sub-disciplines but developing towards a globally mandated revolution in scholarly communication, the ascent of open access looks set to continue. Despite this rapid, worldwide rise, however, many misunderstandings about the phenomenon remain. At the most basic level, this includes the key question: what exactly is ‘open access’?” …
© Martin Paul Eve 2014, Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future


The History Manifesto, by Jo Guldi and David Armitage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). DOI: 10.1017/9781139923880. CC BY-NC-ND

http://library.st-andrews.ac.uk/record=b2173411~S5

“We live in a moment of accelerating crisis that is characterised by the shortage of long-term thinking. Even as rising sea-levels threaten low-lying communities and coastal regions, the world’s cities stockpile waste, and human actions poison the oceans, earth, and groundwater for future generations. We face rising economic inequality within nations even as inequalities between countries abate while international hierarchies revert to conditions not seen since the late eighteenth century, when China last dominated the global economy. Where, we might ask, is safety, where is freedom? What place will our children call home? There is no public office of the long term that you can call for answers about who, if anyone, is preparing to respond to these epochal changes. Instead, almost every aspect of human life is plotted and judged, packaged and paid for, on time-scales of a few months or years. There are few opportunities to shake those projects loose from their short-term moorings. It can hardly seem worth while to raise questions of the long term at all.” …
© Jo Guldi and David Armitage 2014, The History Manifesto

No comments:

Post a Comment