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Taylor & Francis APC Competition

Good news, we have a competition to share!


For the past 2 years Taylor & Francis have conducted a worldwide survey of journal authors' views on Open Access (you can read more about the survey results in a previous blog post). Now the publisher has started a competition to encourage greater engagement with the published survey data.

The publisher is offering a prize of an APC (Article Processing Charge) waiver to the person who makes the most insightful use of the survey data. Effectively, this represents a prize of £1788!

To enter, email your findings to delveintodata@tandf.co.uk or alternatively tweet a link to the findings to @TandFOpen. Entry closes on the 26th of October, so not much time left!

Admittedly the prize is not applicable to everyone - it's also not transferable and there is no cash alternative :(  However, it is still very worthwhile taking a look at the survey data as it gives a real insight into prevailing opinions and also how opinions have changed over the past year.

Are your opinions mirrored by the worldwide academic community*? Why not find out!

*Note that because T&F publishes more Social Sciences and Humanities titles than Science and Technology, the results could be considered biased towards these disciplines.

Comments

  1. How about if T&F removes those pesky APCs altogether? That would be a REAL prize.

    ReplyDelete

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