20 December 2013

St Andrews journal becomes member of Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

The Journal of Terrorism Research has just become a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA). JTR is  published by the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at University of St Andrews and hosted by University of St Andrews Library Journal Hosting Service.

OASPA was established to represent the interests of Open Access (OA) publishers globally in all scholarly disciplines. It does this through 'exchanging information, setting standards, advancing models, advocacy, education, and the promotion of innovation'. The organisation has just announced standards for 'legitimate journals' and the criteria for membership of OASPA. The Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing includes expectations for peer review and governing bodies:
1. Peer review process: All of a journal’s content, apart from any editorial material that is clearly marked as such, shall be subjected to peer review. Peer review is defined as obtaining advice on individual manuscripts from reviewers expert in the field who are not part of the journal’s editorial staff. This process, as well as any policies related to the journal’s peer review procedures, shall be clearly described on the journal’s Web site.
2. Governing Body: Journals shall have editorial boards or other governing bodies whose members are recognized experts in the subject areas included within the journal’s scope. The full names and affiliations of the journal’s editors shall be provided on the journal’s Web site.

See the OASPA blog for further details

See the latest issue of Journal of Terrorism Research

18 December 2013

International survey on attitudes to open access

St Andrews researchers are invited to complete a very short survey on attitudes to open access.

Professor Thomas Eger from University of Hamburg, together with doctoral student Marc Scheufen, is conducting a survey on the experience of academic scholars with and their perception of open access publishing.
One of our objectives is to examine the commonalities and differences between the academic disciplines. For this purpose, we have already conducted surveys in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the Benelux, France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Turkey, India, Brazil, and Egypt.

It would be of special interest to gather additional information on universities and research institutes in the UK and compare the results with those of the other countries. Therefore, we have decided, in co-operation with Prof. Guido Westkamp from the Queen Mary University of London, to extend the survey to British universities. We would kindly ask you to forward this invitation to all professors and other scholars of the faculties/departments of your university.

Your participation will help to provide valuable information regarding the recent discussion on how to organize the dissemination of academic publications in a globalized and digital knowledge society.

The survey should only take around 10 minutes, and respondents can request the final results.

Please find access to the questionnaire at: http://www.equestionnaire.de/?q=10874

Prof Eger is Vice-Dean for Research and International Affairs Director, Institute of Law & Economics, University of Hamburg.

13 December 2013

Mission statement on quality-assured OA research publishing system

The Max Planck Society has presented a draft mission statement in support of the continuing growth of open access.

Ten years since the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities was written, the Max Planck Society hosted the Berlin Open Access Conference (#Berlin11), 19-20 Nov 2013. These conferences have taken place annually, and have been dedicated to support adoption of the Berlin Declaration principles. During Berlin 11, the new mission statement was announced "in order to exploit the innovative and transformational potential of OA", and includes this call:
We call on the signatories of the Berlin Declaration and on all other organisations that perform or support scholarly research to:
  1. increase the support for and interoperability of OA repositories for scholarly materials, while reducing and where possible eliminating embargoes, and improving the ability to re-use works;
  2. support new and innovative OA publishing models that meet the highest possible scholarly standards, and invest into a publication infrastructure optimised for the needs of research and scholarship; and
  3. cooperate with one another to ensure a smooth transition to a stable and functioning, truly open scholarly publishing system, including access to scholarly source and cultural heritage data, where the full text of every research work is open immediately upon publication.
It also urges a strategy that should address standards, quality, stability and a coordinated transition, and concludes:
We believe that a stable, competitive, and quality-assured OA research publishing system offers immense benefits not only to scholarship but also to society as a whole. Scholarly publishing is a global activity, and organisations that perform and support research, particularly those using public money, have a responsibility to work together globally to realise these benefits. It is time to return control of scholarly publishing to the scholars.
See the full Mission Statement at the Berlin 11 Open Access Conference of the Max Planck Society

12 December 2013

Horizon 2020: open access to be achieved via repositories

The European Commission has launched its Horizon 2020 programme of research funding. Open access remains a core principle, and the model grant agreement describes the expectations for grant recipients.

All peer-reviewed scientific publications relating to results of a project must be made open access, either by publishing in an open access journal (gold OA), or by self-archiving in a repository (green OA). In either case, a 'machine-readable electronic copy of the published version or final peer-reviewed manuscript accepted for publication' should be deposited into a repository for scientific publications. If the researcher chooses 'gold' open access then the deposited final version will be made open access immediately. Where researchers choose 'green' open access, then the manuscript (usually the author's accepted version) should be made open access within 6 months.

For St Andrews authors, the usual mechanism of depositing into PURE will allow the Library to help with making your publication open access. Contact open-access-support@st.andrews.ac.uk for advice.

The Open Access in Horizon 2020 factsheet provides more detail, including information about related research data: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/sites/horizon2020/files/FactSheet_Open_Access.pdf

The text of the Model Grant Agreement regarding 'Open access to scientific publications' can be found on page 58, section 29.2: http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/mga/gga/h2020-mga-gga-mono_en.pdf


6 December 2013

Open access publishing initiative for physics

An international consortium of libraries and funding agencies has announced an innovative new model to achieve open access to peer-reviewed literature in high-energy physics.

Through a long period of consultation and a tendering process led by CERN, the global SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access in Particle Physics Publishing) has arranged for high-energy physics articles in key journals to be converted to open access, available under a CC-BY licence.

Based on a complex economic model, the SCOAP3 partners will make central payments to cover the costs of peer review and publishing so that there is no article processing charge for authors. Depending on the journal, either all articles will be open access, or a percentage will be OA (those categorised as high-energy physics in ArXiv) with subscription costs reduced for the consortium partners. Over 20 countries are involved in the partnership, with the UK represented by JISC Collections.

The journals included in the initiative include Physics Letters B (Elsevier), New Journal of Physics (IoP) and the European Physical Journal C (Springer)

The SCOAP3 intiative will start in January 2014 and a dedicated repository will be launched to provide full text access to the articles. More details are available at http://scoap3.org/

SCOAP



29 November 2013

Creative Commons 4.0 - new guidance reduces uncertainty

http://creativecommons.org

Following two years of development, the Creative Commons organisation has released new licences that are more user-friendly and more internationally robust than ever before. Version 4.0 licences have now been launched with changes that "make sharing and reusing CC-licensed materials easier and more dependable than ever before".

Along with the new licences there is updated guidance available that clarifies some uncertainties. The main changes are listed in What's new in 4.0, and the FAQ have been expanded to reference the new licences. Areas such as attribution are explained in detail: as well as confirming that all CC licences require users to acknowledge the creator of licensed material, there is clarification about modifying work:
"You must also indicate if you have modified the work—for example, if you have taken an excerpt, or cropped a photo. (For versions prior to 4.0, this is only required if you have created an adaptation by contributing your own creative material, but it is recommended even when not required.) It is not necessary to note trivial alterations, such as correcting a typo or changing a font size. Finally, you must retain an indication of previous modifications to the work."
The licences themselves have been re-organised with language which is easier to understand across the world, and they now include Sui generis database rights which are recognised in the European Union. The 'human-readable' licence deeds have links to definitions and further guidance, for example what is 'appropriate credit'



Creative Commons 4.0 licences are available now at http://creativecommons.org/choose/

Background to Creative Commons 4.0 development: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Version_4

26 November 2013

Open Access Button - mapping paywalls

A new tool has been launched this week to raise awareness of open access and provide evidence for 'paywalls'. Now if you are asked for payment in exchange for access to a scholarly article you want to read, you can record your frustration, and potentially find a version of the article you were seeking.

The Open Access Button was created by students David Carroll and Joseph McArthur, and is a very simple browser-based tool. It takes seconds to download and install, and is very intuitive to use. In a few easy steps:
  • Sign up for the button at https://www.openaccessbutton.org/ 
  • Drag the button into your bookmarks
  • When you hit a paywall, click the button
  • Details of the article load automatically - just add your location and a note of why you need access
  • Use the tools to search Google Scholar or CORE (an aggregation of repositories) for the article 


In this example, the search took me straight to the article in Research@StAndrews:FullText

How to use the Open Access Button

Guardian article: Push button for open access 

Mapping the paywalls: https://www.openaccessbutton.org/





15 November 2013

Open Access monograph - Wellcome Trust OA funding in action

Just a few weeks after the Wellcome Trust strengthened their open access policy to include monographs, the first OA monograph funded by the Trust has been published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850-2000, by Dr Aya Homei and Professor Michael Worboys, is now available as a free ebook. See the full details, and download under a Creative Commons licence from http://www.palgraveconnect.com/pc/doifinder/10.1057/9781137377029

In an LSE blog post, the author stated:
We are delighted that our book is being published open access and feel that it will ensure that our subject, the history of fungal disease, will enjoy a much wider audience than would otherwise have been the case.
Professor Worboys goes on to describe the process as being the same as it would be for a print version, other than a little extra work on obtaining image permissions - none of which were refused. Sam Burridge of Palgrave Macmillan describes their approach to publishing open access across all their formats, and hopes this book will be the first of many.

Blog post: The Wellcome Trust funds its first open access monograph, helping medical humanities reach wider audiences

To build on the theme of this OA book, we took a look in Research@StAndrews:FullText and found this thesis - rather different in scope but of interest locally:
Patterson, Stephen (1989) The control of infectious diseases in Fife, c. 1855-1950
and via our Research@StAndrews portal we found this article, partially funded by Wellcome, and available free from Europe PMC:
Telford, J. C., Yeung, J. H. F., Xu, G., Kiefel, M. J., Watts, A. G., Hader, S., Chan, J., Bennet, A. J., Moore, M. M., & Taylor, G. L. (2011). The Aspergillus fumigatus sialidase is a KDNase: structural and mechanistic insights. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 286(12), 10783-10792

We hope it won't be long before we can add a Wellcome Trust-funded open access monograph to our collection!

6 November 2013

Impact of open access on teaching

During this year's Open Access Week, BioMed Central highlighted a number of open access articles that address questions of impact on society. Having just caught up with the collected tweets, we are delighted to see an article in BMC Bioinformatics by St Andrews authors Daniel Barker et al. mentioned as a way that open access can benefit the public:
The article is about teaching bioinformatics to biologists at the University of St Andrews with a low-cost computing environment, and an embedded open access course:
By including an explicit Open Access licence, and removing or replacing material incompatible with this from 4273π Bioinformatics for Biologists, we have been able to share it with anyone interested, the world over, in such a way that they can – with minimal care – re-use and adapt it without accusation of plagiarism or copyright violation.
The article is of course open access itself, paid for by the University's membership of BioMed Central

The full list of stories are available from the BioMed Central blog

25 October 2013

Information about Creative Commons added to libguide

Are you new to open access or hearing about Creative Commons for the first time? Do you want to know how to find content that has a specific open access licence? Have you had an article accepted for publication and need to know which Creative Commons licence you should apply to your work?

As part of our Open Access Week inititatives, we have added another page to our open access libguide which addresses these questions and points to useful resources where you can find out more.

See the new page of our guide on Creative Commons licences at http://libguides.st-andrews.ac.uk/oalicences

Celebrating Open Access @ St Andrews

We are always delighted at the wealth of content we discover through our open access services, and the insight we get on the amazing research going on in our academic community. To celebrate this, we have created a range of bookmarks with images illustrating some items in our repository. The first three in the series are shown below, and we will be adding more soon.

 Image from Byrne, RW, Bates, L & Moss, CJ 2009, 'Elephant cognition in primate perspective' Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews, vol 4, pp. 65-79. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1612 

Image from Jaeger, A, Selmeczy, D, O'Connor, AR, Diaz, M & Dobbins, I 2012, 'Prefrontal cortex contributions to controlled memory judgment: fMRI evidence from adolescents and young adults' Neuropsychologia, vol 50, no. 14, pp. 3745-3756. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3243


Image by Tiago Marques, fieldwork for: Aars, J, Marques, TALO, Andersen, M, Belikov, S, Boltunov, A, Buckland, ST & Wiig, O 2009, 'Estimating the Barents Sea polar bear subpopulation size' Marine Mammal Science, vol 25, no. 1, pp. 35-52. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1879



 

22 October 2013

University of St Andrews Open Access Policy

To coincide with Open Access Week 2014, the University of St Andrews has published a position statement on open access. John MacColl, University Librarian & Director of Library Services introduces the new Open Access Policy:
Open Access to scholarly outputs is one of the key challenges for those of us working in research institutions at the present time. Researchers want to have their words read, their data presented and their ideas disseminated. The machinery which makes this happen is complex, necessarily involving businesses, funders, library customers and web-based content providers. What is a reasonable price to pay for research dissemination, and at what point in the transaction chain between reviewers accepting an output for publication and the world getting sight of it is it fair to say that the work has been paid for and can now be made open? Which model best suits different academic disciplines with varying cultures of confidentiality and review? Despite the significant difficulties in finding a way to balance the multiple interests involved, the UK has sought to face up to these challenges in order to arrive at systems of open access which are economically viable and provide for public good and the advancement of knowledge. With research funding now being utilised to develop the Open Access agenda, it is important for us to have a shared vision as an academic community on the means as well as the ends of the publication of research by this University. Our new Open Access Policy provides a statement of that shared vision.

The University of St Andrews Open Access Policy states:
Our preference in respect of publishing in journals is for Open Access by means of the Green route.[...] To achieve Green Open Access compliance, researchers should record their publications in PURE at the time of acceptance, and deposit a postprint in the University’s repository via PURE - or in another appropriate repository.
We also support ‘Gold’ Open Access which usually involves paying Article Processing Charges to publishers of Open Access journals. [...] The Library administers Open Access publication funds which are available to academic authors in certain cases where Article Processing Charges require to be paid.
The policy also encourages academic authors to "consider Open Access publication of monographs where possible".

See the full policy at http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library/services/researchsupport/openaccess/oapolicy/ [print version]

Open Access support and further information is available from the Library webpages and from the Open Access Support team

21 October 2013

Information about open access books added to libguide

To start this year's Open Access Week, the Library has added to its Libguide on open access with a page about open access monographs.

In addition to developments in journal publishing, there are many exciting things happening with book publishing. We have provided some basic information, with links to details on recent developments including new business models. You can also find information about projects and publishers, and how to search for open access books.

See the new guide at http://libguides.st-andrews.ac.uk/oabooks

16 October 2013

Open Access training workshop

Are you confused by 'Green' and 'Gold'? Unsure what your research funder requires or whether your publisher allows it? When can you get funding to publish open access? How can you deposit your work in our institutional repository, and where doe PURE fit in to all this?...

These questions and more will be answered at our workshop for St Andrews academic staff, held as part of Open Access Week 2013.

Open access: publishing options, funder policies, support services and more
Wed 23 Oct, 1400-1630

This workshop, presented jointly by the Library Academic Liaison Team, Research Policy Office (RPO) and with information from Financial Advice and Support (FAS), will give an introduction to open access and new publishing models.  It will give an overview of the publishing options available to researchers in the open access environment.

Suitable for Academic staff, postdoctoral staff, and support staff

For more details, and to sign up, go to PDMS Course booking site

17 September 2013

RCUK Open Access Policy - guidance for St Andrews authors

The new RCUK Policy on Open Access was implemented on 1st April 2013.  We have updated a short two page document which describes the key points in the new policy and gives useful guidance information for St Andrews authors on how to comply.  The document: RCUK OA policy briefing is available along with further details from the Library web pages. The full RCUK Policy on Open Access is available from Research Councils UK.

We hope that you will find this guidance useful. It will continue to be updated as new information and processes are developed.

When contacting the Library to check how to comply with the RCUK OA policy, please provide the following details:

    Your name, School and email address
    Journal and publisher
    Article title, manuscript ID or DOI if available
    RCUK funder name and external Grant ID acknowledged in the paper

Help and guidance is always available by contacting open-access-support@st-andrews.ac.uk

10 September 2013

Report from BIS inquiry on open access

The UK Government's Business, Innovation and Skills Committee published their report today following an inquiry into open access.

Parliament announced the report, emphasising the role of repositories:
"The Government’s commitment to increasing access to published research findings, and its desire to achieve full open access, are welcome, says the Business, Innovation and Skills Committee in a Report published today.  However, whilst Gold open access is a desirable ultimate goal, focusing on it during the transition to a fully open access world is a mistake, says the Report.

The Report calls on the Government and RCUK to reconsider their preference for Gold open access during the five year transition period, and give due regard to the evidence of the vital role that Green open access and repositories have to play as the UK moves towards full open access."

SPARC Europe welcomed the report with this response, stating that "we expect the research community now broadly to support the recommendations contained in this new report."

Among other things the report recommends that RCUK realigns its policy to match that of HEFCE’s post-2014 REF proposals, which mandates immediate deposit in an institutional repository.

26 August 2013

Publisher extends open access choice to monographs

Scholars in Humanities and Social Sciences now have an opportunity to publish open access monographs with Brill’s new initiative:
“As a major publisher in the Humanities, Social Sciences, Biology and International Law, Brill is committed to enhancing access to academic content in any sustainable way. Since its academic book publications are a cornerstone of the program, it is extending Brill Open to include monographs and edited volumes.”
Under Brill's OA option, authors retain copyright and can choose from 2 Creative Commons licences (CC-BY / CC-BY-NC), determining whether commercial re-use is allowed and the cost of the Book Publication Charge. At EUR 5000 for a 350-page book under the CC-BY-NC licence, this ties in with the typical production costs mentioned by Open Book Publishers of £3,500-£5,000, and suggests that a business model for open access book publishing is achievable and affordable.

With the Wellcome Trust extending their open access policy to include scholarly monographs and book chapters* from October 2013 we are likely to see more publishers announcing their options for authors soon.

Previous blog post on examples of OA books and new publishing models

*Wellcome Trust's Monograph and Book Chapter FAQ

23 August 2013

3000 items and the open access cake

In what is becoming a regular summer event, this week we celebrated another landmark for our open access repository with the 3000th item made available in Research@StAndrews:FullText



Akira O’Connor deposited a version of his paper in our Research Information System, Pure, in order to make it open access. The publisher of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, MIT Press, allows authors to archive the final version of their article after a short embargo.
“In the JoCN paper, we report an experiment in which we scanned people's brains as they were completing a memory task. Using these fMRI scans, we were able to show that the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (a region of the brain's surface near your left temple) is actually involved in processing the meaning of words, rather than directly involved in memory retrieval as was previously thought.”
Dr O’Connor already has a number of open access papers in Research@StAndrews:FullText: in most cases these are his accepted manuscripts, the version most commonly allowed by publishers. His latest paper is currently submitted to an open access journal, Frontiers in Psychology. When told about our latest landmark, he contacted us to say:
“That the library has put so much effort into making our work accessible to all is something I'm very proud of. The OA fund and Research@StAndrews:FullText provide a range of options for St Andrews researchers to publish their work in the most suitable journal whilst also acknowledging that the way scholarly output is disseminated is changing. It's a comprehensive approach to open access and I look forward to seeing it go from strength to strength.”
UPDATE: More on open access from Akira O'Connor's blog

The ‘3000’ spot was narrowly missed by an open access article in PLoS ONE, which has been added to our repository under a Creative Commons Licence. The lead author of this paper, PhD student Joana Carvalho, is supervised by co-author Dr Tiago Marques, who also has a number of research outputs in the repository and has previously featured in our blog. This new article describes a study of the population status of the western chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes verus, which has been classified as an Endangered species.

Other recent open access items contributed to the repository include Phd theses:
How terrorism ends : understanding the outcomes of violent political contestation by Sarah V Marsden
The victims of a sorted life : ageing and caregiving in an American retirement community by Philip Y Kao
and journal articles:
Policy change and learning in the RBC model by Kaushik Mitra, George W Evans and Seppo Honkapohja
4273π : bioinformatics education on low cost ARM hardware by Daniel Barker et al.

We will be organising a ‘champagne moment’ soon with our winning author by way of celebration. In the meantime Library staff took a few minutes out to share some open access cake. Not only has our content grown since 2010 - so has our cake!

Open access cake 2010

Open access cake 2013
University Librarian John MacColl

12 August 2013

HEFCE proposals on open access - consulation


On behalf of UK higher education funding bodies, HEFCE has announced a consultation on open access in the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework. The funding bodies are committed to a policy that supports increased public access to research outputs. Advice was sought on developing a joint policy in Feb 2013, and an analysis of the advice received will be available from HEFCE's page on open access to publicly funded research.

Proposals for implementing an open access requirement in the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework have now been published, with responses invited by 30 Oct 2013. Proposals [PDF]

The policy covers journal articles and conference proceedings, and the main criteria proposed are:
  • Outputs should be accessible through a UK higher education institution (HEI) repository, immediately upon either acceptance or publication, though the repository may provide access in a way that respects agreed embargo periods.
  • Outputs should be made available as the final peer-reviewed text, though not necessarily identical to the publisher’s edited and formatted version.
  • Outputs should be presented in a form allowing the reader to search for and re-use content (including by download and for text-mining), both manually and using automated tools, provided such re-use is subject to proper attribution under appropriate licensing.

Monographs are not currently included in the proposals, and there will be allowance for exceptions (either on a case-by-case basis or through an agreed percentage compliance) for example when papers have international co-authors or a publication has no open access option. There are 7 main questions in the consultation, including whether a notice period of 2 years is appropriate.

See the full report: Consultation on open access in the post-2014 REF

The University of St Andrews already provides infrastructure that allows researchers to easily make their outputs accessible. Publications can be recorded in PURE, with links to projects and data added where relevant. Full text can be deposited immediately on acceptance, and automated embargo dates can be set to make the output open access in Research@StAndrews:FullText at the appropriate time. Staff in the Library can help with this.

Contact the library for advice: Open Access support
See our Open Access support web pages


23 July 2013

Art History journal now online and open access

St Andrews Journal of Art History and Museum Studies has been re-launched as an open access journal, and renamed as North Street Review: Arts and Visual Culture. "North Street Review publishes essays representing the diverse approaches to all facets of art history both within the University of St. Andrews, the United Kingdom, and abroad. Inclusive and interdisciplinary, the Review encourages research from all methodological perspectives and invites contributions concerning art history across all time periods and geographical areas." (http://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/nsr)

The journal started life in print as Inferno in 1994, and in 2004 articles from 3 volumes were added to our institutional repository. Over the years we have seen steady usage of these online articles: Asger Jorn and the photographic essay on Scandinavian vandalism by Niels Henriksen, was downloaded 72 times in the last year, and along with Saint Peter and Paul Church (Sinan Pasha Mosque), Famagusta: a forgotten Gothic moment in Northern Cyprus by Michael Walsh was in the top 10 most viewed items of 2011. In 2009 the journal was renamed, and a year later became part of a pilot project to use Open Journal Systems (OJS) as a journal hosting platform. The Library worked with the journal Editors to gather back issues, test out OJS functionality and learn about the process of running a hosting service and an online journal. The thorny issue of copyright permissions was never far away, with most of the content containing images that were only cleared for print versions. The journal continued in print while the Editor worked with a new team on a redesign for the journal, a process for contacting previous authors, and the small matter of completing her thesis!


Cover PageIn the Editorial of Vol 15, Liz Shannon writes "The metamorphosis of the Journal, which began two years ago with a change of title from Inferno, will continue this year with the introduction of a new website. We hope to make more material from past issues easily available and by the end of next year to have most of our back issues online. We encourage any past contributors whose articles are yet to appear on the Journal’s existing website to get in touch so that we can clear this work for inclusion. In addition, our new website will simplify the process of submitting articles to the Journal and make life easier for both contributors and editors."


It is great to see North Street Review launched after a long period of development – there are now online TOCs for everything going back to 1994 and plans to track down permissions for early articles. There is open access to some full text articles from 2003 and the complete Vol 15 (2011) now available.

The Call for Papers for North Street Review 2014 is here:
http://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/index.php/nsr/announcement/view/18

18 July 2013

Student's initiative launches new open access journal

Just over a year ago, un undergraduate student in St Andrews put out a call for interest in starting an academic journal. The idea was to create the 'Journal of Sustainability', an open access journal which would feature distinguished research about the environment, development and sustainability in its widest sense. Since then Margot Cromwell has gathered a team of enthusiastic students from disciplines across the University to design and edit the new journal.

The University Library offered journal hosting services (using OJS software), and the students agreed that this was an ideal platform to meet their needs as it provides the structure and visibility they wanted for their venture. Our planning meetings helped tease out the usual copyright and policy issues, so that the journal had all the necessary agreements in place as content started to roll in.

As well as the support and guidance available from the Library, the new journal manager was able to meet with the student editors of Ethnographic Encounters who had experience of using the service, so even more connections across the University were made. After much hard work, the contributions have been peer reviewed, edited and published in the first issue of the Journal of Sustainability. The articles cover compelling topics, primarily on human activities in the face of climate change, with an interdisciplinary perspective that aims to encourage debate on the subject of sustainable development.


Page Header

Journal of Sustainability


You can access the new journal alongside our growing suite of hosted journals at http://ojs.st-andrews.ac.uk/

 

12 July 2013

All good things...

Intern's log, stardate 12/07/2013: For the past six weeks I have been an intern here in the Repository Team, a post which I obtained through the St Andrews Summer Internships Scheme. It has been a busy time, and a description of all of my activities in detail would be far too lengthy, but I hope this summary illuminates some of the insights I have gained into the library’s operation. Most students, as I was myself, will only be familiar with the public areas upstairs, but this is only the tip of a large, multifarious iceberg. Think pre-global warming, with plenty of space for polar bears sipping a generic, unbranded coke.

The Repository Team works in what I have fondly come to think of as the ‘underbelly’ of the library, and deals with providing digital access to University research publications and theses. One of my primary tasks has been adding thesis content to Research@StAndrews:FullText, a great resource which I hadn’t really heard of or used before I started investigating the job description, but I will certainly be using it now! It’s a great database of content produced by St Andrews, including research output, current theses and retro theses which have been requested through EThOS –another handy research tool. I have added over 200 pieces of content whilst I’ve been here, a task which has included creating coversheets for uniformity, finding metadata and subject headings for increased access, and adding links to the catalogue for visibility. Updating the collections pages also gave me an opportunity to use HTML and exercise an eye for detail to spot dead links and poorly formatted paragraphs in over one hundred pages. As a rather pernickety person I have found it all to be very enjoyable, and through reading the abstracts of theses I've learnt about diverse topics such as dolphins and lasers - a combination of knowledge which I promise to use only for the good of mankind.

On a serious note, although the classification work may seem fiddly, when you realise the sheer scale of the content which the library holds then you see it is thoroughly necessary. My desk is in-between the acquisitions, cataloguing, and processing departments, and hundreds of items pass through here every week, as well as the digital content which the library is constantly acquiring. It's important we know what it is and where it is, otherwise the utility of the library would completely break down - imagine if Wikipedia had no search function, and you could only press the 'random article' button to try and find that information you need! All of this unseen work is really what makes the library function so well for you as a user, and until SAULCAT gains sentiency (estimated for 2079), next time you pull up a record be sure to think about the work that goes into acquiring, cataloguing and processing your item.

Another strand of my work here has been investigating who funds the research which occurs at St Andrews. Changes in regulation mean that many funding bodies, such as the RCUK, EU, and Wellcome Trust, require that research which they have funded is made accessible online. Open Access is still rapidly evolving, so it was exciting to be a part of something which is changing as you work on it, and my main task has been to detail the research funded by the RCUK and Wellcome Trust over the last year, so that we can identify things we may be able to add to PURE (our research portal). I've also had to do some investigation to track down authors of theses which we wish to upload, some of whom left over forty years ago. This made me feel rather like I was on Heir Hunters- it's on after Jeremy Kyle but before Bargain Hunt - where they track down long lost relatives. Nobody I found got a huge windfall, but I think it's nice for people to know that their research is still wanted after so long, and that it will always have a home at the University.

The library has really made a great effort to make sure that I got the most out of my time here, and so I've been lucky enough to visit lots of people in different departments. Again, it's too much to detail it all, but I would like to thank all of the people I've seen who have given so generously of their time, which quite clearly has so many demands on it already. As a book-lover and historian/classicist I've really enjoyed seeing some of the treasures of Special Collections, as well as the gifts and bequests which the library is lucky enough to receive. It has also been interesting to follow material from ordering to shelving, learning about how it is acquired and then the various processes it goes through. The overwhelming impression has been that there really is more to the library than you would imagine, in terms of scale and operations, and that the staff work very hard to make it a user-friendly experience.

So, have I been persuaded that my future career lies in librarianism? Well, as a person who can't decide on a cake (as happened this morning) let alone a career, I am not entirely sure. What I will say is that I've learnt many transferable skills (necessary buzzwords for an arts student), both library-related and more general things to do with the work environment and myself, which I know will benefit me immensely in the future. I would encourage anybody thinking of applying for an internship with the library next year to do so - you're in safe hands!


Heather Curtis (Guest blogger & intern)

Ancestry investigator requests St Andrews thesis

Here at the library we don’t just do letters, but numbers as well. When a request came in to view a thesis entitled ‘Robert Beale and the Elizabethan polity’ by Mark Taviner, from a Mr Beale located somewhere in Cornwall, we quickly put two and two together to realise that this was probably somebody researching their ancestry. Following on from the BBC’s request last month, this is another great example of the diverse requests we have to view St Andrews theses. Thanks to the strong Open Access policy to which the university is committed, St Andrews research is given fantastic visibility and impact, and so Dr Taviner’s thesis is now helping to unlock family mysteries at the other end of the country.

Dr Taviner’s thesis is available in the Research@StAndrews:FullText archive here: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3709, and let this serve as a reminder for my fellow historians – be careful what you write in your essays, because if you end up insulting somebody’s great?-grandmother, they might find out about it!


Heather Curtis (Guest blogger & intern)

11 July 2013

Thesis highlights academic value of Special Collections

Amidst the many treasures of Special Collections lies the Von Hügel Collection. At around five thousand volumes it represents a significant gathering of 19th and 20th century works on philosophy, religion, and history, as well as original and annotated manuscript papers. Assembled by Baron Friedrich von Hügel (1852-1925), Hon. LLD St Andrews 1921, it was bequeathed to the university upon his death in 1926.

Von Hügel’s philosophy is still debated, and this year St Andrews doctoral student Robyn Wrigley-Carr made a contribution to the scholarship with her PhD thesis: ‘The Baron, his niece and friends: Friedrich von Hügel as a spiritual director, 1915-1925’. This serves to prove that these documents, and many other Special Collection texts like them, although valuable for their beauty and antiquity, are also a key research tool for scholars.

Special Collections rightly keeps its valuable store well-guarded and looked after, so they probably wouldn’t be too pleased if you wandered in for a browse with a muffin, but you are welcome to read Dr Wrigley-Carr’s thesis whilst shedding as many crumbs as you like:
http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3588

Heather Curtis (Guest blogger & intern)

BBC request St Andrews thesis

Every student to pass through St Andrews leaves a legacy in one form or another, and for our postgraduates this often takes the shape of a thesis. The university requires students to submit a copy of their thesis to the library in order to graduate, but who is it that might end up reading your precious creation, years or even decades after you have gone?

Well, you’ll be pleased to know they’re not just propping up the desks here in the underbelly of the library where the repository work takes place, and unfortunately they make for rather unwieldy coasters. In reality, whether in digital or print form they are a tangible monument to our university’s research excellence, and recently an urgent call came through from the BBC. It’s not unusual for us to receive requests for viewings from scholars around the country, primarily through the British Library’s EThOS service, but last month the team behind ‘Coast’ requested a copy of F. M. Fraser’s 1977 PhD thesis: ‘The Lewisian and Torridonian geology of Iona’ – on the double!

With a tight filming schedule on Iona to be met, there was no time to send it off to London for digitisation as would usually happen, and so it was rushed off to Special Collections to be scanned in-house. One week later we presented the BBC with four hundred pages of geographical goodness, saving the day by assuring there would be sufficient educational content to match the moody shots of Neil Oliver’s locks flapping about in the wind. Whoever said that library work isn’t glamorous?

Season 9 of ‘Coast’ will be hitting our screens in 2014, but for the keener amongst you, here is a link to Dr Fraser’s thesis in Research@StAndrews:FullText:
http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3812

Heather Curtis (Guest blogger & intern)

19 June 2013

'Open Access' now open access

Essential reference book Open Access, by Peter Suber, is now available in multiple open access formats from MIT Press:
In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn’t, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber’s influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers.
Peter Suber is  Director of the Office for Scholarly Communication Office at Harvard, Director of the Harvard Open Access Project, a Faculty Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and Senior Researcher at SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). He is widely considered the de facto leader of the worldwide open access movement.
The book continues to be available in paperback, and is now freely available in ePUB, Mobi, PDF and HTML from http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

29 April 2013

Collective approach to open access by Science Europe

Science Europe has just released a position statement on the transition to open access. Their press release states:
Science Europe’s 51 member organisations are all committed to ensuring that results of publicly-funded research and innovation in Europe are available through an unrestricted, online access system, and have identified a list of ten principles that will ensure consistency and coherence in their efforts towards Open Access.
The principles include recognition for the role of repositories and the mixed approach of 'green' and 'gold' routes to open access. They also stress that 'the hybrid model, as currently defined and implemented by publishers, is not a working and viable pathway to Open Access.' The short position statement and shared principles can be found at http://www.scienceeurope.org/uploads/Public%20documents%20and%20speeches/SE_OA_Pos_Statement.pdf

Science Europe is an association of European Research Funding Organisations (RFO) and Research Performing Organisations (RPO), based in Brussels. It includes the UK Research Councils and aims to promote a collective voice for the European Research Area.

1 April 2013

RCUK Open Access Policy briefing

1st April 2013 is the start date for the new RCUK policy on Open Access. We have compiled a short two page document which describes the key points in the new policy and gives useful guidance information on how to comply for St Andrews authors. The RCUK OA policy key points and guidance document is available from the Library web pages at http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library/information/furtherhelp/openaccess/ .


The latest RCUK open access policy revised on 6th March 2013 is available at http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Pages/outputs.aspx

RCUK are expected to issue revised guidance early in April 2013 as a result of further consultation with stakeholders. We will keep you updated on announcements through this blog and on our webpages. Help and guidance is always available at open-access-support

UPDATE: Latest revisions to the policy guidance and new FAQ available from RCUK OA policy page at http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Pages/outputs.aspx

25 March 2013

Highlighting open access outputs in School of Classics

Following collaboration between the Library repository team and School computing officers, the University of St Andrews School of Classics has developed new web pages highlighting content from Research@StAndrews:FullText.

Using RSS feeds and scripts to repurpose the data, the new Classics site provides a dynamic list of completed theses, with options to view abstracts and link to the full text. There are also handy links back to Library web pages with further information on finding theses and general advice on open access. (Note, not all theses are available to download immediately due to embargoes).



In addition there is a page that links to open access research publications by staff in Classics, all of which have full text available in Research@StAndrews:FullText

Our embedded usage stats show healthy downloads for some of these research outputs, for example 'Written Into the landscape : Latin epic and the landmarks of literary reception' (PhD thesis by James S McIntyre, 122 downloads) and 'Training athletes and explaining the past in Philostratus' Gymnasticus' (Book chapter by Dr Jason Konig, 70 downloads).

Link to School of Classics Postgraduate research and staff publications from http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics/research/

11 March 2013

Evidence for BIS open access inquiry

The UK Government's Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) committee has published the written evidence for its inquiry into open access. The inquiry was announced at the end of Jan 2013.

98 pieces of evidence have been submitted by societies, publishers, researchers, institutions and other contributors such as Research Libraries UK and SPARC Europe. These deal with topics including use of Creative Commons licences, cost of APCs and the role of repositories.

The written evidence is available at http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmselect/cmbis/writev/openaccess/contents.htm

This follows a  similar inquiry heard by The House of Lords Science and Technology Committee, and ahead of a request from RCUK for feedback on its revised open access policy. Despite various consultations, there are still some points that require clarification before the new policy comes into effect on 1 April 2013.

6 March 2013

Revised RCUK open access policy

Research Councils UK (RCUK) has today published the latest version of its guidance for its revised Policy on Open Access, which comes into effect on 1 April 2013. The guidelines contain additonal information on how block grants are to be used to enable open access for RCUK-funded research outputs. The University of St Andrews will receive £203,593 in April to cover these costs.

RCUK are seeking feedback on the revised guidelines, to be submitted by 20 March 2013.

A finalised OA policy will be published with any further clarifications on the RCUK OA Policy page.

Research Councils UK logo

28 February 2013

March for open access

The University of St Andrews has received funding from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) to help with the transition to open access. During March 2013 funds will be available to cover 'Gold' open access costs, and to support 'Green' open access options.

To claim Article Processing Charges (APCs) from this 'BIS OA fund', or to find out how to make your article open access by depositing into our repository Research@StAndrews:FullText, contact open-access-support

See more information on our Library web pages on open access, including:

26 February 2013

Proposals for post-2014 REF open access

The UK funding councils have issued proposals for open access to research outputs in the next Research Exellence Framework after 2014. The proposals recognise "the significant role of institutional repositories in increasing sustainable and convenient public access to research" and do not express a preference for 'gold' or 'green' routes. The proposals also cover funding body expectations, embargo periods, monograph publication and principles of open data.

Times Higher Education article: Funding councils publish REF open-access proposals

HEFCE's letter outlining these proposals (pdf)

HEFCE invites advice and feedback in a consultation process to run until 25 March 2013.

24 February 2013

Landmark US directive on open access

On Friday 22 Feb 2013 the White House issued a directive which requires federal agencies with annual research and development budgets of $100 million or more to provide free online access to the results of that research, within a year of publication. It has been described as a watershed moment by Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC and follows closely on the introduction of a new open access bill to the US Congress: Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR).

These two important developments have been praised by open access advocates such as SPARC, Creative Commons and the Association of Research Libraries, and are compared here by Peter Suber. While the directive and FASTR differ on proposed embargo lengths, they both recommend deposit in a repository as the route to open access, rather than the 'Gold' route (publication in OA journals) favoured by the UK government.

The announcement and policy are available from the Obama Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The directive comes after years of campaigning for open access, and a We the People petition 'Require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research' which received over 65000 signatures and this official response.

21 February 2013

Ethnographic Encounters latest open access articles

We are pleased to announce that the open access journal Ethnographic Encounters, hosted by the University of St Andrews Library Journal Hosting Service, has released its latest issue. Now in its third volume, this journal has been developed by a team of enthusiastic and talented student Editors under the leadership of Dr Craig Lind.

Ethnographic Encounters ISSN 2051-1353
Ethnographic Encounters is a platform for the work of the University of St Andrews undergraduate Social Anthropology students. The e-journal presents a valuable resource for future students to draw on the experience and insights of their predecessors, and offers a means for Social Anthropology students throughout the world to engage with their peers in St Andrews.

Congratulations to outgoing Editor Francesca Vaghi as she hands on the reins to a new Editorial Team.

27 January 2013

Open Library of Humanities launches

Open Library of HumanitiesA new project has launched with the aim of "building a low cost, sustainable, Open Access future for the humanities."


This inititative should be of great interest to those who attended the main event hosted by the University of St Andrews Library for Open Access Week 2012 - The humanities and open access: opportunities and challenges.

Details of the academic backing and plans for the project can be found at http://www.openlibhums.org

Open Library of Humanities (OLH) will be an open access “megajournal” in the style of the US-run Public Library of Science (PLOS) http://www.plos.org and http://www.plosone.org; which will publish thoroughly peer reviewed humanities and social science research under Open Access conditions at a financially fair rate.

The Open Library of Humanities aims to provide a platform for Open Access publishing that is:
  • Reputable and respected through rigorous peer review 
  • Sustainable Digitally preserved and safely archived in perpetuity 
  • Non-profit 
  • Open in both monetary and permission terms 
  • Non-discriminatory (APCs are waiverable) 
  • Technically innovative in response to the needs of scholars and librarians 
  • A solution to the serials crisis

24 January 2013

Transition to open access

Since the release of the Finch report in June 2012, open access has been high on the agenda for researchers, and many HEIs have been busy developing their support services to help navigate the changing landscape of scholarly publishing. Repository services in University of St Andrews Library currently provide support for deposit of full text ('Green' OA), advocacy for open access, advice on copyright and licensing, opportunities to start open access journals (through our journal hosting service), and co-ordination of open access payments for research outputs ('Gold' OA). The services are currently being developed to respond to the increase in demand for open access support, and in particular to help manage our compliance with the new RCUK policy on open access.

The University of St Andrews is one of the 30 research intensive Universities in the UK which is receiving a £10 million allocation of Government money to help with the exploration of and transition to open access publishing models. The University’s share of the fund totals £137k. The Library has contacted all Directors of Research to provide additional information about this funding and how we want to work with our academic community, so we can all gain a better understanding of the issues we will need to address in order to make this transition a success. This will help us prepare for the allocation of block grants from RCUK to pay for Article Processing Charges (APCs) for RCUK-funded outputs.

Our existing web pages about funders' open access policies will be updated, and members of the Library's Academic Liaison team will be consulting with researchers. We will operate two distinct phases:
  • The initial “BIS funding” will allow us to investigate a range of open access options, seek feedback from our academic community and prepare for the transition towards open access
  • Operation of the RCUK block grant to be received in April 2013, which will allow us to implement the new RCUK policy on open access and pay for ‘Gold’ open access

We welcome enquiries from St Andrews researchers:
Email open access support

Further information and contact details at http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library/information/furtherhelp/researchsupport/researchoutputs/