Skip to main content

Posts

Funding available for fully Open Access publishing

As we approach Semester 2 we thought it would be a good opportunity to remind St Andrews authors who choose fully Open Access (OA) journals of funds available to support their publishing.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) block grant If you're funded in whole or in part by any of the 7 UK Research Councils and your chosen journal is listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (https://doaj.org/) you can access the block grant to pay the article processing charge (APC).

Wellcome Trust and the Charities Open Access Fund (COAF) COAF funds fully OA publication and, until January 2020, continues to support OA in subscription journals (hybrid publication).
COAF will only pay for Open Access and won't pay other publication charges.

Library Open Access Fund Since 2013 this fund has been made available to St Andrews authors who don't have any other source of funds and who choose fully OA journals. 

Provided the submitting or corresponding author is a member of staff, the journ…
Recent posts

14th Berlin Open Access Conference

Last month the 14th Berlin Open Access Conference was held, with the title ‘Aligning strategies to enable Open Access’. Over 170 participants from 37 countries and 5 continents attended the event, and delegates came from a range of organisations including universities, libraries, research funders, and government agencies. This diverse spectrum and the resulting consensus on the conference outcomes clearly shows the strength of the current drive for Open Access. The international appeal of the event is a clear sign too that the concerns around subscription pricing and the slow progress to open access are global and international.

“As it became clear from statements made by representatives from Japan, the United States, South Africa and others, that readiness to adopt this approach is now extending beyond Europe, where it originated, and is currently being adopted in several countries; in particular, this was emphasized in a bold statement from China, the nation with the largest share o…

Clarivate Analytics chosen to provide citation data for REF 2021

Research England has announced that Clarivate Analytics' Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) has been chosen to provide the citation metrics for the next UK research assessment exercise - REF2021.

The data supplied by ISI includes the number of times a publication has been cited in other academic publications - referred to as citation counts. According to the latest Research England press release this has been requested by 11 of the 34 expert panels, and will be used to feed into the peer-review process during the research assessment phase of the REF. ISI will use the citation data collected by Web of Science, and then match it to the publication records supplied by institutions. Regarding concerns about the accuracy of the matching process, RE have offered reassurance:
[I]nstitutions submitting during REF 2021 will be able to view the citation counts for items they plan to submit to the REF in the relevant units of assessment and confirm that a correct match has been ob…

Feedback requested on implementation of Plan S

Following the recent Wellcome announcement of its revised Open Access Policy, today new guidelines on the implementation of Plan S have been announced. The guidelines are published in full with details of technical requirements at https://www.coalition-s.org/feedback/ and feedback is welcomed from all stakeholders, including the public.


cOAlition S is committed to fulfil the specific target set out in Plan S – immediate Open Access to all scholarly publications from research funded by coalition members from 2020 onward  Three routes to achieve OA will be compliant:
Publish in fully Open Access journals listed in the DOAJ or on Open Access platforms Deposit in Open Access repositories listed in OpenDOARPublish in subscription journals with 'transformative' agreements in place or that permit accepted manuscripts to be deposited immediately with a Creative Commons Attribution licence, such as Royal Society titles The guidelines cover questions of cost, licensing and timing, wit…

Wellcome Trust announces new Open Access policy

Following an 8 month review the Wellcome Trust announced its latest Open access policy on 5 November.

Some key changes Deposit into PubMed Central (PMC) and Europe PMC Articles must be made freely available by the official final online publication date instead of within 6 months of the final publication date Article processing charges (APCs) OA publication in subscription journals (hybrid) will no longer be compliant unless associated with Jisc Collections transformative OA agreementsJournals chosen must be indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)Only journals and platforms that follow criteria that cOAlition S may set out in future for OA journals and platforms will be compliant Pre-prints Authors are encouraged to post pre-peer review pre-prints under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence. This is mandated during public health crises Research assessment Wellcome-funded research organisations must publicly commit to a statement of intrinsic merit of the researc…

Breaking free - out of embargo

The route to Open Access can be surprisingly long and winding. In this last post for Open Access Week 2018 we look at some examples of publications that are now freely available to all from our repository - in most cases a year or more after first publication.

Why wait to make these articles open access, you may ask? Because... "copyright"
The latest article to become open access after a 12 month embargo is:

Understanding a hydroformylation catalyst that produces branched aldehydes from alkyl alkenes, Dingwall, Paul; Fuentes, José A.; Crawford, Luke; Slawin, Alexandra Martha Zoya; Buehl, Michael; Clarke, Matthew L. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/16318

This paper adds to the ever increasing number of freely available publications from our research community - this week we celebrated the milestone of 15,000 items in St Andrews Research Repository!

"This paper is a detailed study aiming to understand a catalytic reaction that gave…

Thesis Thursday 2018 : a wider notion of research

As part of #ThesisThursday in Open Access Week we are pleased to host a fascinating guest post from our colleagues in the Library E-theses team:

Why do we make research theses available in the St Andrews Research Repository?
It’s a question that we are asked from time to time by both research students and academic researchers in our own institution.  Our answer is invariably that the institution should make its research available online to as wide an audience as possible.   Researchers expect to discover material online and they expect to read it online.  We have a policy to collect electronic research theses and make them available open access where possible, (unless subject to embargo), to promote and showcase University research, and to make it as accessible as possible to a global audience.  This is the core of our reasoning as to why we resource and manage the service.

But are ‘researchers’, in the purest sense of the word, our only consumers?  Or does the audience for our thesis…